Will moth balls repel mice from your RV? Here’s the verdict

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Theories abound about ways to keep mice and other rodents out of your home or RV. Some RVers say dryer sheets like Bounce will repel the creatures, others say Irish Spring soap will do the trick. And there are a dozen other ideas of what will keep mice and other rodents from taking up residence where you don’t want them.

One of the most touted methods that some RVers swear by is using moth balls.

In this video “Mouse Buster” Shawn Woods sets up a controlled test inside a barn, using motion detecting cameras to spy on the rodents when they appear at night to dine on tasty sunflower seeds. In his first test, using four moth balls in a small box, the mice ate every single seed, so that didn’t work.

Shawn tests again, this time putting 40-50 moth balls in the box. What happened? Did all those moth balls send the rodents scurrying away? Watch the short video to find out.

Now, watch Shawn’s video where he tests if Irish Spring soap will keep rodents away.

##RVT961

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J anne
3 months ago

Watching videos and podcasts are not practical for me. Please give transcript without the watch the video to see the answers as the only alternative.. I really want to know about the mice tests and would appreciate if you would give answers in words not just videos PLEASE!!!!! Thanks.

Stanley Sokolow
3 months ago

I had a rat making a nest on top of the engine of my Class C motorhome which was parked in front of my house. She used insulation fibers she had pulled from the hood blanket to build a beautiful little cup-shaped nest. Rat poop and urine was all over the engine compartment, but luckily she didn’t chew any of the wires. I got rid of the nest and placed a lot of mothballs all over the engine parts, then closed the hood. Within a day, the rat was back there re-making her nest. The mothballs had no effect. She even pushed some of them aside to make space for the nest. What finally worked was leaving the hood open to deprive her of privacy. She didn’t come back. My conclusion: mothballs stink, but they also stink as rodent repellents. I’ve also found that those sonic devices don’t work, not even the ones that claim to be superior because they randomly vary the frequency of the noise. We put several of them in a barn, but the mice still came to eat the horse feed.

Sink Jaxon
3 months ago

IMO, mothball smell is nothing short of disgusting. I had the lousy luck of staying 3 days next to a camper that reeked of mothballs, and was usually downwind from him. I guess people get used to anything after awhile…

John Goodell
3 months ago

We have done a lot of RV’ing since we got our 5th wheel back in 2012, but we also store the camper for months at a time between trips. I started out storing it with small cotton bags of mothballs in all the strategic spots of the storage and living areas, along with using mousetraps and sealing up the openings. It definitely worked better than nothing, but my wife said she could still smell the mothballs long after I thought the smell was long gone and it gave her a headache. So I started using small peppermint oil ‘lamps’ in the living area and stuck with the mothballs in the basement storage areas. It worked OK and smelled pleasant, but I still got a few mice. Last year I stuck with the plan and added Irish Spring soap chunks scattered around the outside and under the camper, and I added more every couple of months. We didn’t get a single mouse over the last 10 months. I really wanted to keep the mice out and all I can say is that it worked.

David Binkley
3 months ago

It is almost as if the mice know to hold their breath, run in a fill up their mouths full of seeds and split!

rvgrandma
3 months ago

In 2001 we went back east for my MIL’s funeral. After the funeral we took my FIL up to their trailer in a NH park. My MIL had used moth balls to keep mice away. The smell when we walked in was horrible – even removing all the moth balls we could find did not help. Because my FIL had Alzheimer’s Disease and wandered we could not leave the door open. By morning we did not feel good. She also spread moth balls out in her lawn to keep cats away. I guess they worked for them.

HAROLD E GOEBEL
3 months ago

We’ve been using those very same mothballs for years and placing them by the bagfull on the floor under the camper and in the camper when we store for the winter. the fiver is in our barn when not in use. we have never had a mouse problem but that might be ascribed to the occasional black snake.

BILLY Bob Thronton
3 months ago

Lion urine. Tell that guy to test that stuff.

Michael Daus
3 months ago

My pest expert says the tin cat style of mouse traps are the best. What do you think?

Tommy Molnar
3 months ago

Frankly, I’m not interested on ‘repelling’ mice. They never go away. They stick around and have babies. I want them dead, pure and simple. And I don’t care how they GET dead, so long as they’re dead.

N. Zapf
3 months ago

Old-fashioned mice traps are effective and more humane than glue traps.

David B Lastoria
3 months ago

It seemed like mothballs worked in my storage unit. But last winter, I had found evidence of mice. So, a few months ago, I bought a bunch of those “Glue traps”, that are like a plastic 4 inch square with the stickies of glue ever. Within a few days, i guess, a mouse met its match as it walked on this trap. I came home a couple of weeks later to find my victim. So, seeing the positive results, I cleaned out the shelves at Menards….lol

Bring on the troops, blotches, imma ready for you!!!…lol…

D. Johnston
3 months ago

Imagine your skin being pulled off your body while you are trying to get off of a giant glue trap. This is what a mouse feels. Quick death is more humane.

Lana J Frank
3 months ago
Reply to  D. Johnston

Agree. My husband used glue strip one time, that was enough for me. Poor thing was trying everything to get his feet unstuck. Use mouse traps if you want them dead. Much more humane. My son catches them at his house in little trap door cages and releases them in the woods out by his workplace. We have raised compassionate humans.