Want to RV around Canada, eh? Our readers suggest their favorite routes

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By Emily Woodbury

In a recent poll on May 12th, we asked if you’ve ever been RVing in Canada. More than 2,200 of you responded, and 74 of you left comments. Out of those 2,200, 46 percent of you had been RVing in Canada at least once (and 30 percent of those had been more than once). A little less than a quarter of you responded that you never have, but you’d like to.

Canada, (usually) so easily accessible by RV, should be on every RVers’ travel list. If you’ve never been, there are tons of online resources to help you plan the perfect trip. If you have been, our poll had asked you to leave a comment, hoping you’d share where you went and what it was like. Many of you did, so we thought we’d compile your comments and share them here for others to ponder. Trip planning, anyone?

“We’ve driven all the Canadian provinces and territories except Newfoundland/Labrador (next trip north) and Nunavut (no roads). All are beautiful but the best were Quebec (around the NE part south of the St. Lawrence) and Northwest Territory and Yukon. We flew out of Dawson City, YK (amazing little town) to Inuvik, NT, then drove the top 90 miles of the Dempster Hwy to Tuktoyaktuk, NT – the farthest one can drive north in Canada. Aw, heck – the whole country is gorgeous – too many places to mention.” — David Oglesby

“We crossed into Canada from N. Dakota at Portage, to Lang, SK., on to Alaska. Another trip we crossed in Upper Michigan, west to Yukon Territory up into Alaska and another we went west in the US and crossed into Canada from Oregon. We also crossed into Canada’s eastern Ontario and Manitoba, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. Canada is a beautiful country from coast to coast. The Eastern Provinces are especially so in September and October.” — Danny Wells

“In British Columbia, the Train and Telephone museum near Prince George RV Park was interesting and dog friendly. We loved Banff National Park in early May. Lots of elk and no crowds. Jasper National Park was ok, but nothing compared to Banff. If coming south from Alaska end of June, be sure to stop at Stewart, B.C., for their Canada Day Parade. The entire town turns out, half of them in the parade. Helicopters drop candy for the kids. Then drive out to Hyder, Alaska, for fudge at the border and fresh fish for lunch in a school bus. The road into Stewart has the most beautiful blue-toned glaciers I have ever seen, right along the road. The food ranged from good to great everywhere we went in Canada. Same for Alaska.” — Janice Cox

“Have lived near the border with Canada all my life. My wife’s mother was born in Hamilton, ON. We have been in every province except Saskatchewan and Manitoba, most of them many more times than we can count. Border crossing is easy if you are respectful and silent and have the correct paperwork. Prices look high, but the current discount is 25% (Canadian $ cost $.75). Some stuff just is more expensive, some not so much. Other than Toronto, driving is fairly relaxed. Facilities in campgrounds in the eastern Provinces are on a par with facilities in the northeastern US, old and small. We love traveling in Canada.” — Paul S. Goldberg

“Our most memorable trip was to Happy Valley-Goose Bay in Labrador, 3,589 miles from home. In 2018 almost all the 1500 kilometre/932 mile Labrador route including Quebec was gravel. At 36’ 5th wheel we were, apart from semis, the biggest thing on the road, that was until we met our new friend from Minnesota in his 45’ tag axle Tiffin. An extension of this trip was a 5 day supply ship cruise up the Labrador Sea to 5 Innu and Inuit communities. I highly recommend this trip, including the cruise, to all adventuresome RVers.” — Steve Barnes, Kamloops, BC

“We went to The Pinery in Ontario. Very nice large park right on Lake Huron. They even allow dogs to swim in one of the areas. From there we traveled to Bruce Peninsula and Georgian Bay. If we didn’t know better we would have thought we were in the Caribbean. The water was so blue!! Good hiking and lots to do in the area. Would highly recommend both spots!!” — Terri Savory

“We traveled across Canada – Alberta, BC and YT, traveling to Alaska. Some of the most beautiful scenery and very abundant wildlife anywhere. We spent almost a month there slowly going to Alaska and enjoyed every minute. So many things to experience. I would advise anyone to make that trip.” — Gregg Gill

“I am a Canadian and a proud resident of Newfoundland and Labrador (NL). I have RV’d as far west as Alberta and the northeastern USA, especially enjoying the eastern provinces and upstate New York. I love most to tell people about the eastern Canadian provinces because they may not be as well known to folks on this forum. If you are looking for unique experiences travel all the way to NL, where the people and scenery will amaze you. Nature is on full display with icebergs, whales and sea birds, coastal hiking trails and breathtaking vistas. Historical sites date back to 1000 AD. Stand on the most easterly point in North America, visit UNESCO World Heritage Sites, and relax with the people and place. Take a look at the provinces travel guides (search Tourism NL) to see what’s in store. But it might well be all the little experiences you have along the way that will make the best memories. I don’t mean to be a travel/tourism promoter, but this place is maybe less known but so worth visiting.” — Wilf Bussey

Well, there you have it. Are you tempted to plan a trip to Canada yet? I sure am. You can find the poll and read more of the comments here.

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Thomas
3 months ago

Too much of a bother crossing in,out of. Mostly getting back into US. and I like to take my pistol but that’s a BIG no no. Maybe Canada could come up with a way to disable a gun , like a stainless cable down the barrel with their lock on it ( like our tsa) and then they’d remove it when going back into usa.

Matt Johnson
3 months ago

We’ve been full timing for about 2 years now and originally thought we would travel Canada as well for about a year. Then we found out that since we travel with self protection tools we are not allowed in Canada. So unless somebody has a really good place to hide their self protection tools then I would not recommend it going to Canada.

Bob M
3 months ago
Reply to  Matt Johnson

You don’t need “self-protection” tools in Canada. Leave them at the border, you won’t regret it.

Alvin
3 months ago
Reply to  Matt Johnson

Matt, you don’t need anything to protect yourself here, the lawyers and criminals handle everything for you. Here’s how it works the criminal gets the first shot in, a state appointed lawyer comes along and defends his actions then , you as victim get to read your personal impact statement to the court and the bad guy is set free.

WEB
3 months ago
Reply to  Alvin

If you have ever voted, then you voted the policy makers in, no one else’s fault.

Alvin
3 months ago
Reply to  Matt Johnson

…oh and just forgot. Now that the Prime Minister has DAYS AGO, ruled 1500 DIFFERENT guns to now be labelled assault weapons, therefore to be criminal, you can bet that very few Canadians have guns – therefore no means to either acquire one or own one for any reason. Check it out before you come here if you think you can smuggle a gun in here. You’ll be in big doo-doo if you are caught with the gun or use it FOR ANY PURPOSE. Al lthe info you need is on the internet.
Fun fact, I cannot buy a toy gun and bring it across the 49th parallel. Check it out.

WEB
3 months ago
Reply to  Alvin

Instead of me looking for the info, please back up your statements with trustworthy links (there are very few of these left).

John
3 months ago

We wanted to travel, (after driving up the coast from Florida), up thru New England, Maine, then into New Brunswick, visit PEI, then Nova Scotia. Then ferry over to Newfoundland, work our way up Labrador. Then eventually thru Quebec from the NE towards the SW and cross back into the US at upstate NY. Travel down the Northway to the Saratoga/Ballston Spa area, where we have family. The bad thing is though, we wanted to do this and wind up by our family around mid-DEC. But from what we have researched, find campgrounds from mid-Nov to mid-Dec, in these areas, would be nearly impossible.

WEB
3 months ago
Reply to  John

Yeah, all the Eskimos come down during that time to balmy Southern Canada and take the campsites. Igloos EVERYWHERE. Comparable to Florida’s snowbirds, these are called Snowgeese.