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Dennis
7 months ago

Any chance of the pictures being click-ably enlarged in future newsletters? This would help quite a bit in the BOLO sections, especially. It’s not like I am reading this on a 55″ tv, lol. I would love to be able to help someone get their camper back or arrest a criminal, but I’d rather not have to download and “save as” to do it, because that takes space some of us don’t have, or work computers don’t allow it. Some people only have their phone.

Otherwise, I really enjoy the newsletter.

Diane M
7 months ago

Nudists in Ontario? Brrrrrrrrr!

Alvin
7 months ago

The most valued part of receiving this newsletter is finding where the hot spots of Recreational pursuits are. So we can avoid them!

We leave home for the great outdoors and often the unknown to escape the hustle and bustle of bumper to bumper, elbow to elbow human activities. Not that we don’t like human contact, at all, we just want to avoid the racket, the fur pal mommy feeding her baby ice cream from the bowl she’s eating from, and all the rest of the crazy stuff going on today.

We seek what’s left of our natural environment. We do all we can to protect what’s left, playing a role leaving something behind of value for the few who do not wish to be among a raging river of 12 million crowding into a ruined area like in that picture.

We want just nature, birds, perhaps a coyote running through the site, the stars at night, the booze and drug free environment. We abhor artificial light buggering up an otherwise gorgeous off the beaten track campground. It’s all getting harder to find, but thanks to RVtravel we can eliminate places like Great Smokey Mountain National Park, and scenes like is displayed in that picture from our itinerary.

Gary Johnson
7 months ago

We ordered the adjustable brass water pressure regulator from Amazon. It’s been about a year and I’m no really sure about it! But, I did mount it in my plumbing compartment. I went to HD and purchased a 1 1/2” X 3” u-bolt, and two 90 degree brass connectors similar to what you would use to hook up your washing machine. I turned one connector to the city water inlet, then added the valve horizontally and then the other connector. I measured for shims between the valve body and the panel, drilled holes and installed the u-bolt to hold the valve tight. I leave the fresh water hose connected and now I don’t worry about leaving my valve behind on the spigot and no concerns about ‘knocking’ it around, a common complaint about damaging the valve.

Monkey Paw
7 months ago
Reply to  Gary Johnson

There seems to be a lot of reviews mentioning that the brass of this item cracks. Secondly is all the oil leaking from the gauge. Folks should watch out for these things.

jillie
7 months ago

The Smokey Mtns are best during the week. We did and found the weekends are a nightmare. Go during the week. Less crowded.

Ed D
7 months ago
Reply to  jillie

Last year, we went to the Smokies at the end of October during the week, and there were several campgrounds available.

Ann
7 months ago

We went to Great Smoky Mtns NP in fall, 2018. Beautiful place, but we couldn’t get out of there fast enough. It was so crowded we could barely move. Roads were jammed, trails were packed, and we couldn’t pull off the road to park, because it was all full. The only thing that wasn’t jam packed was the campground, for some reason.

I can only imagine what it was like in 2019.

Scott
7 months ago
Reply to  Ann

Oh yeah. Weekends are the worst. Even more so when the car shows are in town. Best time to be there are Monday – Thursday. Too many weekenders flood to there

Kerry Hartman
7 months ago

I guessed Civic as the vehicle in the brain teaser !

Vic
7 months ago

Smoky mountains national park by the law that created it does not charge an entrance fee

HGoff
7 months ago
Reply to  Vic

Right – we’ve been there numerous time -no entrance fee – not sure about the “back door” comment above. there are several ways into the park.

Tom Smithbrother
7 months ago

Toyota will ramp up truck production at its new Mexico plant to 100,000 vehicles a year by 2021 in a major step to shift production of its popular mid-size Tacoma pickup truck to Mexico from the United States, the company said on Thursday. The plant in the central state of Guanajuato, along with an older facility near the U.S. border, will bring Toyota’s Mexican production to 266,000 trucks a year when at full capacity. Toyota said it expects to send 95% of pickups from the two plants to the United States, where the automaker sold nearly 249,000 Tacomas last year.

The exact type of thing we need import duties for. Taking the jobs out of the USA yet expecting (Being freely allowed) to sell 95% of that produce in the USA. Their is nothing sold to Mexico,by the US that will ever balance out that trade deficit.

Bill
7 months ago

Thank NAFTA/USMCA agreement for this. It’s all about lining the pockets of the 1%’ers.

BobM
7 months ago

I was the victim of an American company moving jobs from Canada to the US and then treating Canadian employees like dirt. The Canadian employees had to sue the US company for their rights under Canadian law.

Last I heard Toyota was Japanese. Maybe the American workers should have accepted lower paying jobs to keep production in the US. After all, that’s what American companies expect others to do in reverse.

Every time I’ve come across a US company buying a company outside the US they’ve cut jobs locally and moved that work to the US. And, wouldn’t you guess it, the US companies expect to continue doing business as usual in the country they’ve just entered. Just happened to my nephew in the UK.

Alvin
7 months ago

I gave you a thumbs up on that point Tom, but at the heart of this is perceptions that the Tacoma is a better rig than an entrenched domestic.
The numbers of sales and especially resale value seems to prove that.
I recall as a body man, having a rusted to the door handles Toyota pickup truck come in one day. It had been lightly hit in the rear, bumper bent, tailgate damaged beyond repair, brackets damaged etc.

That 10 year old rig if it had been a Chevy S-10 would have been written off before the adjustors ink dried on the death report, but not that little Toyota.

When questioned why insurance would repair such a piece of crap Terry G,. the adjustor told me these Toyotas even in the condition this one was in still would sell for thousands of dollars, parted out – they parts sell for crazy money. That was 20 years ago.

I doubt much has changed. In Southern Alberta where I hang my hat, dealers are filled to capacity with domestics – there’s hundreds. if you want a clean Tacoma – you’ll be lucky to find one and if you do you could very easily find yourself in a bidding war to land it in your driveway.

For anyone interested enough to investigate how Toyotas Hondas and Nissans took a grip on the public mind and wallet, I can recommend a dozen books – but no better one exists that Micheline Maynard’s ” THE END OF DETROIT” (2003) subtitled “How the big three lost their grip on the American Car Market”

Everything regarding the state of this topic is in that book